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Patients 'exploited' by promise of miracle cures

By Steve Nowottny

Vulnerable patients with incurable conditions are being increasingly ‘exploited' by the online advertising of ‘miracle cures', according to the charity Sense About Science.

A new guide published this week aims to help patients distinguish between beneficial treatments and bogus remedies.

And Dr Mike Fitzpatrick, one off the report's authors and a GP in Hackney, east London, also urged patients to question the evidence-base of more established complementary therapies.

‘It just isn't true that there is good evidence for the value of either homeopathy or acupuncture,' he said. ‘Homeopathy is a miracle cure in the sense that it's proved a miracle that water can be turned into money – it doesn't work in terms of the treatment of any significant disease.'

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