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Pharma studies favour own drug

A history of chronic migraine more than doubles the risk of ischaemic stroke, new research reveals. The risk was similar for migraines with or without aura, according to the meta-analysis of 14 trials, published on the BMJ website.

Women with migraines who were also taking oral contraceptives were at an eight-fold increased risk of stroke.

The international team of researchers suggested irregular blood flow, cardiac abnormalities and hormonal problems could be responsible.

Dr Alan Begg, chair of the Angus stroke network and a GP in Montrose, East Stirlingshire, said if a woman taking oral contraceptives presented with migraine for the first time he would stop the contraceptives.

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