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At the heart of general practice since 1960

Praying to the gods of the NHS

The NHS is the closest thing the British have to an organised religion. If we are priests, surely our consultant colleagues are gods.

GPs fulfil role of 'local priests' in community

Priests, by necessity, must be lowly paid, if at all. 

You can see your priest, but God takes a little longer, though you may be reassured you will meet him one day.

God's word is written, and your priest interprets it to the faithful. It is not a two-way conversation.

Your priest can arrange for you to meet him, but would get into trouble for doing so.

Financial contributions, by implication, increase your chances of a meeting.

You follow the advice of your priest, and pay your dues, in the faith that if you need him, God will be there. This is blind faith and it needs to be. 

You would be devastated to find God was not there.

God loves you.

You may not see, or touch, or speak to him, but he does love you. Your priest tells you so.

Dr Tom Robinson

Sully, Wales

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