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Prescribing comment is slur on profession

Having read the correspondence over Professor Sir Michael Rawlins (January 5) I wonder which ivory tower he lives in? How disappointing that he blames GPs for prescribing problems. I agree with Dr Aspinall, such insinuations are offensive.

How many of us have made prescribing errors? Probably a reasonable proportion? I can recall most of mine, and learned from them, and fortunately no patient was harmed.

The most frequent reason I can identify for them is not having sufficient information about the patients and their medications. The classic scenario is the acute hospital admission when the patient or carers have not listed or brought all their medications and attempt to relay what purpose the tablets might serve.

How often have we, as junior hospital doctors, made a guess as to what the patient was prescribed in the past by other hospital physicians and their GPs?

Such academics making wildly unwarranted and offensive claims need to be given a reality check.

Maybe Professor Rawlins should spend a year in general practice dealing with the real world?

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