Cookie policy notice

By continuing to use this site you agree to our cookies policy below:
Since 26 May 2011, the law now states that cookies on websites can ony be used with your specific consent. Cookies allow us to ensure that you enjoy the best browsing experience.

This site is intended for health professionals only

At the heart of general practice since 1960

Prescribing cost is hardly spiralling

Why do you use the emotive word ‘spiralling' when describing the 60% increase in the cost of GP prescribing since 1996? (‘GPs could be limited to strict drug formularies', pulsetoday.co.uk/news).

This is less than 4% per annum compounded, and considering an increase in population of 1-2% from Eastern bloc countries, plus people living longer, the increasing health demands of old age, and the availability of better (and therefore more expensive) treatments, increasingly demanded by better informed patients, let alone the demands of the QOF, this shows magnificent restraint by GPs.

The word spiralling should be reserved for gas prices, rail fares, petrol costs, MPs' salaries and ex-Prime Ministers' lecture fees.

Dr Ric Naish, Ealing, west London

Rate this article 

Click to rate

  • 1 star out of 5
  • 2 stars out of 5
  • 3 stars out of 5
  • 4 stars out of 5
  • 5 stars out of 5

0 out of 5 stars

Have your say