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At the heart of general practice since 1960

Relatively small sum could help sort out mental health problems

Professor Gene Feder

answers the Pulse

careers questionnaire

What/who made you decide to go into general practice?

A persistent feeling of claustrophobia while working as a hospital doctor.

What would you have done if you hadn't been a doctor?

Written bad novels.

Who's your career role model/guru?

Paracelsus, a 16th century physician (although his career is a model for making lots of enemies and an early death).

What's your career high-point so far?

Sending my mother my first published research paper.

And the low-point?

Being cited by Michael O'Donnell in an article titled 'Evidence- based illiteracy', in which he said reading my prose was more demanding then quarrying

granite.

Is there anything interesting on your office/surgery wall?

A culturally appropriate health promotion leaflet in Bengali with a photo of Henry Cooper striking out with his fists.

What leisure interests do you/would you list on your Who's Who entry?

Arguing with my teenagers and reading newspapers, preferably at the same time.

What's your fantasy career move?

Running a secondhand bookshop.

Professor Gene Feder is professor of primary care at Barts and the London Medical School

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