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Retiring is 'bad for health', altruistic organ donations triple and the parents who stripped their son's room of toys to help him sleep

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines on Thursday 16 May

Thinking of retirement? Think again, as a new study claims retiring is bad for your health, the Telegraph reports.

A study from the think-tank Institute for Economic Affairs found that while giving up work can give people a short-term boost, it appears to trigger a drastic long-term decline in both their physical and mental health.]

Researchers argued that if the Government pushed up the pension age and removed other regulation which discourages older people from taking on jobs, it would boost the economy and make people happier and healthier for longer.

The study comes as official Office for National Statistics figures show a record 980,000 people over 65 were still in work in the first quarter of this year.

The number of people giving one of their organs to a stranger almost tripled last year, the BBC reports.

The Human Transplant Authority (HTA) approved 104 so-called ‘altruistic’ organ donations in 2012-13 compared with 38 the previous year. Altrustic donations now make up about one in 12 of all living donations.

The figures include the first case of someone giving part of their liver to a person they had never met.

Diana Warwick, chair of the HTA, said the huge increase in people willing to donate an organ was ‘incredible’.

And finally, the parents of a three-year=old boy who started waking up and playing loudly in the early hours of the morning have stripped his room of toys that could stimulate his imagination, the Daily Mail reports.

Freddy Taylor’s nightly play sessions - which his mother called ‘sleep parties’ - became so exhausting that after two years of sleep deprivation his parents sought specialist help.

They were advised to strip his room of anything bright or colourful that could catch his eye, put him to bed and wake him up at the same time every day, as well as feed him foods like bananas and peanut butter which release the sleep chemical melatonin.

‘Freddy has a very vivid imagination. He can be incredibly loud, so much so that I actually went round next door to apologise when our new neighbours moved in,’ said Mrs Taylor, from Sheffield.

‘We’ve taken down his posters, taken out his toys, that sort of thing. His bedroom is painted a calming green colour already so we haven’t had to redecorate.’

 

Readers' comments (1)

  • As a recently retired GP I can say with some authority that The Daily Wail is talking bollocks.

    What IS good for your health though is reading Pulse to see what a train crash of a career being a future GP will be.

    Just off to the beach. Good luck x

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