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'Royal colleges should take revalidation from the GMC'

Medical royal colleges should decide whether doctors are revalidated, not the GMC,

a former president of the council has told the Shipman

Inquiry.

Sir Donald Irvine attacked the use of GP appraisal backed by clinical governance reviews as 'the sole source' of evidence for revalidation.

In a final submission to the inquiry, released last week, Sir Donald described the plans as 'asking the NHS to be the regulator of doctors in all but name'.

He said: 'That is not its role and not what it is designed to do.'

The inquiry is expected to be critical of the GMC's plans for revalidation when it reports later this year.

Sir Donald, who resigned from the council in 2001, said royal colleges were better placed to manage revalidation because they held doctors' continuing professional development records.

'They have the knowledge and experience and close links with the specialist societies needed to fine-tune revalidation to subspecialties that are quite small and by definition different,' he added.

'Only they can say how good medical practice maps on to the practice and circumstances of their members.'

Revalidation folders ought to include feedback from patients and colleagues and peer and patient-reviewed videos, Sir Donald said.

The RCGP refused to comment on what it described as Sir Donald's personal view.

Sir Graeme Catto, current president of the GMC, said many of the issues had already been addressed.

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