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Self-monitored patients have lower blood pressure in surgery

By Lilian Anekwe

Patients who monitor their own blood pressure at home have small, but significant, reductions in pressures when measured in surgery, according to a group of UK primary care researchers.

They carried out a systematic review of 25 randomised controlled trials of self-monitoring which either measure systolic and diastolic pressures taken in surgery, or the proportion of patients who achieved a blood pressure target.

Patients who self-monitored had on average blood pressures that were lower by 3.82mmHg systolic and 1.45mmHg diastolic compared to those who just had their pressures measured at routine visits.

Self-monitoring increased the chance of meeting a blood pressure target by 9%.

Study lead Professor Richard McManus, professor of primary care cardiovascular research at the University of Cambridge, said: 'Self-monitoring of blood pressure is an increasingly common part of hypertension management and this review shows it reduces blood pressure by a small, but significant, amount.'

The British Hypertension Society have a list of approved home monitors at different prices.

Annals of Medicine online 27 May

Self-monitored patients were found to have a lower blood pressure when it was measured in a GP surgery Self-monitored patients were found to have a lower blood pressure when it was measured in a GP surgery

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