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'Mobiles cause headaches'

The story

Mobile phones may be responsible for headaches, mood swings and loss of hearing, the Daily Express reports.

The source

The Irish Doctors' Environment Association studied 16 people who claimed they were sensitive to mobile phones. The research found 13 of the 16 suffered from sickness, headaches, confusion and dizziness after use.

Expert view

Dr James Rubin, research fellow in psychological medicine at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, said: 'This study does not tackle the most important question: are these people genuinely sensitive to electrical equipment or is there some other explanation for their ill-health? The only way to settle it is to expose these people to electromagnetic fields under double-blind conditions.'

'Transplant cures diabetes'

The story

A double kidney and pancreas transplant can offer a near-instant cure for diabetes, according to the Daily Express.

The source

The story is a case study of a patient with type 1 diabetes who successfully received a double kidney and pancreas transplant at St Mary's Hospital, Paddington.

Expert view

Dr Rudy Bilous, professor of endocrinology at James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough, said: 'Kidney and pancreas transplants have been around a long time but haven't had a high profile in the UK because many surgeons feel the results aren't good enough. We don't have many teams capable of performing them.'

'Hep B vaccine causing MS'

The story

The hepatitis B vaccine may have caused MS or arthritis in hundreds of health professionals,

the Sun claims.

The source

The Heb B Jab Victim Support Group has claimed thousands of people in the UK could be affected. Last November research published in the journal Neurology found people vaccinated against hepatitis B were at three times the normal risk of MS.

Expert view

The World Health Organisation said: 'The WHO does not believe the findings provide convincing support for the hypothesis that immunisation with recombinant hepatitis B

vaccine is associated with an increased risk of MS. Health workers may bring neurological symptoms to the attention of physicians earlier than others.'

'Patch boosts sexual desire'

The story

A scented patch worn on a woman's wrist can boost sexual desire, reports the Daily Mail.

The source

CST Medical Ltd, manufacturer of the Scentuelle patches, issued a press release extolling their virtues. It claimed sniffing the patches hourly targeted the brain's 'pleasure centre' with a constant supply of dopamine-like chemicals.

Expert view

Dr Sarah Jarvis, women's health spokesperson for the RCGP, said: 'We're used to research taking into account the placebo effect, which is likely to be powerful in the psychosexual context. It doesn't mean this patch is useless, but there must be cheaper placebos.'

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