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Study gives GI warning on cox-2s and warfarin

PSA testing may be unreliable in obese men, a new study suggests.

The research found obesity appeared to lower PSA levels and that testing might need to be adjusted to take body weight into account.

Previous research has suggested obese men with pros-tate cancer are diagnosed later than normal and have a worse prognosis.

The US study of 2,800 men, published online in Cancer this week, found PSA levels fell in a linear fashion as the patient's weight increased.

PSA levels in men in the highest weight category, with a body mass index of over 40kg/m2, were 32 per cent lower than in men of normal weight. The association remained when age and ethnicity were taken into account.

Dr Emma Knight of Cancer Research UK said: 'This study suggests the PSA test, as it stands at present, might fall short of accurate diagnosis in obese men.'

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