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DEVELOPMENT

Women GPs more into ‘giving' than seeking power

By Emma Wilkinson

Women GPs are gravitating towards roles in education and professional development, Pulse's gender gap investigation shows.

The RCGP topped the list of organisations in terms of representation of women, with 35.4 per cent of positions on faculty boards, the national council, and taskforce committees filled by female GPs.

Around 36 per cent of the RCGP council is made up of women, compared to only 24 per cent of GPs on the BMA council.

Dr Clare Gerada, a GP in south-east London and member of the RCGP council, said the RCGP was a welcome alternative to the aggressive politics of the BMA and LMCs.

She said: ‘I was chair of Lambeth LMC. The politics was much more masculine. You might be tapping into a real sexual difference here.'

She added: ‘Maybe women are more interested in education because it's a much more giving thing.'

Female GPs are also better represented in postgraduate deaneries than most other organisations, though the figures are still not entirely representative.

More than a quarter of

associate dean positions are filled by women, but the figures drop to around one-fifth at director and deputy director level.

Just one of the seven postgraduate deans is female and women account for one in five of the 4,250 GP trainers on Pulse's circulation list.

Dr Julia Oxenbury, who recently gave up her clinical

work to become director of GP education at the South West Peninsula deanery, said education was still a male-dominated world.

She said: ‘I have just been brought in and I didn't have any women associate directors which is a real shame and I only have a few at course organiser level.

‘Women are equally as good as men – often better – at

teaching.'

ewilkinson@cmpinformation.com

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