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Thank you for the music

Manifestos, soap-boxes and airbrushed posters aside, it is the choice of a rallying campaign song that separates a winning politician from the pack.

By Nigel Praities

Manifestos, soap-boxes and airbrushed posters aside, it is the choice of a rallying campaign song that separates a winning politician from the pack.

New Labour famously employed D:Ream's 'Things Can Only Get Better' to help propel them into power in 1997 and Obama used 'Yes We Can' to powerful effect last year.

Contrast that with John McCain's Abba steal 'Take A Chance On Me' (mm maybe not) and who has heard of the Conservative Party theme for 2001, Heartlands by Mike Batt (anyone?).

Now insiders have exclusively revealed to Pulse magazine that the health spokesmen from the main political parties will be squaring up with their own personal campaign songs for this year's general election. And, as you'd expect, we have had a sneak peak at the shortlisted tunes.

The Conservative Party, we're told, has narrowed their search for a winning ditty to either 'Gimme Gimme Gimme (more private sector funding in the NHS)' by Abba or a mashed-up version of 'Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (and the national programme for IT)' by Andrew Lansley's favourite Elton John.

The Liberal Democrats are toying with the old soul classic ‘If You Don't Know Me by Now' although their health spokesman Norman Lamb is trying to persuade his musical protégé Tinchy Stryder to record a new version of ‘Hello...is it me you're looking for?' by Lionel Richie.

Labour meanwhile is dressing up the same old lyrics with a different tune, but may have a winner in ‘I Want You (NHS to be my preferred provider)' by the old smoothie Marvin Gaye, although party activists secretly admit most GPs will be humming ‘Won't Get Fooled Again' by the Who. Allegedly.

If you have any more suggestions, then please post them below and we will forward them on. I am sure Burnham, Lansley and Lamb will appreciate the help.

PulseToday deputy editor By Nigel Praities PulseToday deputy editor By Nigel Praities

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