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The ePortfolio - a difficult beast to master

New the CSA is over, the GP Apprentice is looking at how to polish up his ePortfolio and is finding it more difficult than it first appeared.

New the CSA is over, the GP Apprentice is looking at how to polish up his ePortfolio and is finding it more difficult than it first appeared.



Still in the relief stage of passing my CSA my focus is now on polishing the all singing and dancing ePortfolio.

How many clinical encounters make a learning objective? How many learning objectives lead to professional development?

These questions and more will be facing us over the next few years. I have recently heard that some deaneries will be asking for every sessions debrief as a GPR or a log of daily work while in hospital will need to be entered into the log.

Do they realise that we have lives to lead after seeing our patients, signing the scripts, reading the pos and doing the odd visit or two? One of the great reasons we are hoping to be GP's is the great call of work life balance. The ePortfolio is still in its early days but remains a difficult beast to master.

Out of hours is my next target to shoot down, 48 hours in 6 months may not sound a lot but gnawing away at these hours isn't as easy as expected. It can be quite pleasant to be driven from house to house, seeing the local geography, but not at 3am in the morning.

Advice calls present another minefield for the unwary registrar, from unexpected deaths to advice for a simple graze it can be quite a stressful few hours. Time to book some more sessions me thinks.

And finally this month the QOF game has the great big reset button pressed. The figures are in and yet again we realise that, given the financial incentive, asking our patients if they smoke becomes the most important part of every consultation.

Perhaps it is time for update to Roger Neighbour's model to add in QOF between connecting and build rapport. However there is now light at the end of the tunnel for smokers - it seem like they can just blame it on their genes.


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