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The story of Tom and Mary

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This is Tom.

Tom is a doctor.

Say hello to Tom.

‘Hello Tom’

 

Tom has something around his neck.

What could it be?

It’s a stethoscope.

‘I use my stethoscope to listen to your heart,’ says Tom.

 

Tom has a lot of patients to see.

He wants to make them better.

He looks in to their eyes, he looks in to their ears.

And he feels their tummies.

Tom gives them special medicine.

And Tom feels very important.

 

But look at the time!

It’s 9 o’clock.

And it’s dark outside.

 

Tom is still at work.

He is still looking at pieces of paper.

He is still typing on his computer.

He is still talking to people on the phone.

And look, poor Tom is holding his head in his hands.

     

Tom’s wife is called Mary.

Say hello to Mary.

‘Hello Mary’

Mary feels lonely.

Mary is drinking another glass of juice and crying to her favourite song.

‘Oh dear’

 

Tom gets home.

He doesn’t feel important anymore.

Mary has packed her bags.

And here she is putting her bags into Mike’s car.

 

Tom should have listened to Mary.

But Tom was always at work.

And now he doesn’t have anything else.

 

Goodbye Mary.

Goodbye Tom. 

 

Dr Kevin Hinkley is a GP in Edinburgh

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Readers' comments (8)

  • So, so true. Excellent writing as usual.

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  • Count the cost to yourselves folks, and make sone changes.

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  • Wife put up with me for two years. I was angry all the time and I did not even know it. My son was growing up without a father even though I was there. If it wasn't for her I wouldn't have been able to stick two fingers up to the partnership and walk away. The extent of how damaging that job was to me only became apparent a few months after quitting. Best thing I have ever done. No more seeing extra patients on top of a 30 strong clinic. No more 15-20 phone calls after every session. No more hundreds, and multiplying, of blood results and documents to action. No more fruitless meetings with burnt out and angry colleagues taking up what little free time I had....etc Life tastes better now and I make more money for it as well. Being a partner is slow death , No one will thank you so overcome your fear of the unknown and set yourself free.

    My wife did not leave me because she is a super loyal woman. Not many are these days so I now spend a lot of time trying to make it up to her.

    A Happy Locum GP.

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  • I was depressed when working as a salaried GP. now so much happier locumming.

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  • I think some people need to stop whinging, crack on and get some hard work done - it never killed anybody.

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  • Well, as it happens hard work has killed a few over the years.

    BUT

    I sincerely hope that you are not equating what amounts to torture for doctors in the NHS with Hard Work.

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  • "I think some people need to stop whinging, crack on and get some hard work done - it never killed anybody."

    Is that you Jeremy?

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  • Tom is so dedicated to his job that he is tired and makes a mistake.
    Tom's licence to practice is taken away.
    Tom really now has nothing except a daily wail headline.

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