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There ain't no party like a Friday foetus party

Our roundup of the health news headlines on Friday 13 January

Our roundup of the health news headlines on Friday 13 January
 

The Daily Mail promises to make you thin this year, using a diet tailored to your genes. The ‘DNA' diet, developed with the help of experts at Newcastle University, uses a genetic test to determine which food and exercise regimes are right for your body type.

A trial in 7,700 people in Denmark saw nine out of ten lose up to 26lb of weight, and a smaller study of 21 found they managed to keep off the weight 20 months later.

This news comes adjacent to warnings from all the papers that bacon can kill you. A study published in the British Journal of Cancer, found that eating 50g of processed meat a day - the equivalent to one sausage or two rashers of bacon - increased the risk of pancreatic cancer by 19%, the risk increasing the more meat you eat.

A top midwife raised concerns over the ‘commercialisation' of pregnancy, reports The Telegraph as many women see their ultrasound scans as events and host ‘foetus parties'.

Professor Cathy Warwick, chief executive of the Royal College of Midwives warned that parents who celebrate so early in the pregnancy may need intensive counselling if something goes wrong further down the line. She also warned that the trend towards using pregnancy as a commercial tool, as some private companies provide a champagne celebration scan package for £165 and a VIP scan package for £185, raises ethical questions.

The Guardian warned that life saving procedures might disappear from the NHS as in a move towards privatisation which the paper believes could bring in 'the worst aspects of US healthcare'. 

Documents obtained under the Freedom of Information act show that officials in the Cabinet Office plan to privatise the NHS compensation fund. The BMA warns doctors forced to take out unaffordably expensive medical insurance will avoid high risk operations or specialisms such as obstetrics.

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