Cookie policy notice

By continuing to use this site you agree to our cookies policy below:
Since 26 May 2011, the law now states that cookies on websites can ony be used with your specific consent. Cookies allow us to ensure that you enjoy the best browsing experience.

This site is intended for health professionals only

At the heart of general practice since 1960

Trick and Treat

An eccentric and wide-ranging attack on lifestyle advice, screening programmes and the medical profession receives a rather sceptical reception from our GP reviewer

An eccentric and wide-ranging attack on lifestyle advice, screening programmes and the medical profession receives a rather sceptical reception from our GP reviewer

The book provides a cynical account of how doctors, pharmaceutical companies and Government-appointed healthcare agencies are misleading people into believing longer and better lives will follow by adopting a healthy lifestyle.

The author Barry Groves – a fervent campaigner on nutritional issues - is highly critical of the concept of ‘healthy eating', which advocates eating less animal fat and more polyunsaturated vegetable fats.

He asserts that there is no evidence that people are living healthier lives as a result of lifestyle changes.

Groves makes a valid observation that the Government and the doctors do not spend anywhere near as much on prevention of illnesses as on treatment, but then goes on to argue that this is all a part of deliberate ploy to create illnesses so that pharmaceutical companies can make profit by selling their drugs.

He accuses drug companies of adopting deceitful methods to develop new drugs to increase their profits. He comes up with a startling observation that whenever doctors go on strike, there is always a dramatic fall in death rate, which apparently goes to show doctors are contributing to deaths by their medical intervention.

He quotes several examples to illustrate this point, based on historical facts.

He is also very sceptical about the results of the Ipsos MORI poll taken in 2006 which showed an overwhelming 91% of the population voted doctors the most trustworthy professionals in the UK for the 22nd year running, because the poll was funded by the BMA.

While claiming that the Government and doctors do not spend much time on prevention of illnesses, he is also critical of the screening systems that are aimed at detecting early cancer of the cervix, breast or prostate, saying that if the patient has been found to have any changes suggestive of malignancy, he or she must already have the disease and so it can't be true prevention.

The book will prove highly controversial and in my view lacks scientific credibility, but it will serve to fuel the debate about the healthy lifestyles we advocate for our patients and ourselves, by challenging many of the current established practices.

It is unlikely that a doctor reading this book will find it anything other than amusing at best.

Dr Krishna Korlipara

Rating: 1/5

Rate this article 

Click to rate

  • 1 star out of 5
  • 2 stars out of 5
  • 3 stars out of 5
  • 4 stars out of 5
  • 5 stars out of 5

0 out of 5 stars

Have your say