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At the heart of general practice since 1960

Trusts are urged to haul GPs up over quality data

'Miracle cancer cure'

The story

A miracle cure could bring cancer patients back from the dead, the Sun claims.

The source

The story of a 10-year-old girl with a type of lymphoma, related to immunodeficiency. She

was in a coma with five tumours in her brain, but was saved by a transfusion of killer T-cells after conventional chemotherapy had failed.

Expert view

Professor Peter Stern, head of immunology at the Paterson Institute for Cancer Research in Manchester, said: 'This approach has been used before. It is encouraging and not unanticipated but unfortunately only for a minority of cancers.'

'Household chemicals danger'

The story

A host of seemingly innocuous household products could be contaminating your body with harmful chemicals, reports The Independent.

The source

A WWF study published on the charity's website tested the blood of 155 individuals and family members around the UK for 78 toxic chemicals. It detected between 20 and 49 per person.

Expert view

Professor Alan Boobis, professor of biochemical pharmacology at Imperial College London,

said: 'I don't think there is any reason to be alarmed. These are trace amounts of chemicals which are very persistent. There is a lot of talk about this but to produce effects you need to get very high doses.'

'New bug can kill in hours'

The story

A new bug can kill healthy people in a matter of hours, the Daily Express warns.

The source

The alarm about the toxin ­ known as Panton-Valentine leukocidin ­ was raised at an inquest into the death of a young Royal Marine, who

died in just 48 hours after scratching his leg

on a gorse bush. The soldier contracted staphylococcus, which developed into PVL.

Expert view

The Health Protection Agency said: 'The majority of PVL-producing strains of Staphylococcus

aureus and even MRSA are treatable with several

antibiotics. These organisms can be quite virulent, but the agency has only seen a small number of cases over the past three years and the risk of contracting an infection in the community remains extremely small.'

'Glass of milk helps heart'

The story

A glass of milk a day beats heart disease, the Daily Express claims.

The source

A study of 665 men published in this week's Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health found those who drank large amounts of milk were at reduced risk of stroke and ischaemic heart disease, although only the reduction in stroke risk was statistically significant.

Expert view

Belinda Linden, head of medical information at the British Heart Foundation, said: 'Milk can indeed play an important part in a heart-healthy diet, but it would be wise to stick to semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to achieve the nutritious benefits while minimising saturated fat intake.'

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