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'Vapers' risking lung disease, DH worried GPs will be overrun by e-cig requests, and Britain living longer in good health

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines

Smokers trying to kick the habit by switching to flavoured vapourisers could be risking long-term health problems from unregulated products, as research finds three-quarters of flavourings contains toxic chemicals.

The Telegraph reports Harvard University researchers found Diacetyl in three out fo four samples, the chemical responsible for respiratory disease bronchiolitis obliterans, or ‘popcorn workers lung’.

The chemical, used as a butter substitute in flavours like cupcake, and cotton candy, is deemed safe to eat but hazardous when inhaled over long periods.

And in the Mirror, reports that e-cigarettes could be available on the NHS as early as next year, but ministers have kept the information quiet to prevent GPs being ‘over-run’ by prescription requests.

The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency ­licensed the ‘e-Voke’ vapouriser last month - a product from British American Tobacco – with the government believing it could save the NHS money and reduce harms from tobacco smoking.

And according to the Sunday People ‘a Whitehall source’ said: ‘We didn’t want to make a song and dance about it because GPs would be overrun by people demanding it. But this is something we’ve been pushing for.’

And finally, good news for GPs eyeing up an early retirement in the face diminishing pensions and spiralling workload as the BBC reports increases in Brits’ life-expectancy are being matched by increasing good health.

The research, published in the Lancet, found between 2011 and 1991 men spent four more years in good health on average, and women spent three. The study looked at self-reported evaluation of ‘good-health, as well as time free of cognitive impairment (dementia) and life without physical disability.

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