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A bittersweet win...

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Welcome to our newest blog, #nextgenerationGP. Chantal Cox-George will blog from the perspective of a medical student in general practice. Use the hashtag to join in the conversation

I want to be happy that a junior doctor has fought off fierce competition from young professionals much more experienced in business to win BBC’s ‘The Apprentice’. I want to say that it is great PR for doctors because it proves that they are well-rounded, ambitious individuals who are versatile enough to turn their hands to anything and succeed in it. I want to say that Dr Leah Totton’s victory also doubles up as a win for all young, professional women showing men that we can equal them on any stage.

Yet the cynic in me is slightly disappointed that Leah won. To be fair, I wasn’t hugely impressed by any of the candidates vying for Lord Sugar’s £250,000 investment in this year’s show. Yet at just 24 years old (only 3 years older than myself), the media have inaccurately portrayed Leah as an ‘experienced’ doctor – she is a clinical director, fresh out of medical school.

Putting the undeniable fact that Dr Totton is a junior doctor to one side, her business is medical aesthetics. Whilst I have great admiration for Karren Brady, her excitement about an all-female final becomes less of a success for feminism when one finalist markets an all-pink baking brand and the other appears to endorse somewhat superficial attitudes towards appearance held in society.

I ask you to momentarily forget all of the moans and groans supra and take this opportunity to congratulate Leah. Well done to her, it can’t be easy to endure such a long process which appears to be just as much about raking in large audiences as it is finding a business for Lord Sugar to invest in and then to emerge victorious. However, I’ve come to believe that in order to appear more credible in any venture one undertakes as a doctor, the more clinical experience you have, the better.

 Chantal Cox-George is a medical student at Bristol University. Join in the conversation with the hashtag #nextgenerationGP

Readers' comments (8)

  • Bob Hodges

    "Whilst I have great admiration for Karren Brady, her excitement about an all-female final becomes less of a success for feminism when one finalist markets an all-pink baking brand and the other appears to endorse somewhat superficial attitudes towards appearance held in society."

    Well played!

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  • As an "experienced" (I say this in inverted comma as although I've been a GP for 5 years I still feel inexperienced), a lot of understanding of working of medicine comes with age.

    mortgage application made me understand the impact f a rushed diagnosis. Being married made me much wiser to how fractuations in hormones can really affect my better half (no sinisism intended). Having a baby and then a child made me understand the anxiety and self doubt many parents goes through. Many of which can only be adiced with decent amount of credibility if you have experienced it yourself.

    It is Often the life experience which colour us to be a more rounded, understanding doctor, not just the clinical experience.

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  • Did her plan really show good business acumen? If one had a really good business plan, I don't think 250k would have been a big ask from a bank.... its the same as a good mortgage. A commercial loan meant she could have had 100% of the profit. She may have felt the publicity would be advantageous marketing wise, but the public comment has drawn more attention to concerns about her experience which might backfire when it comes to people actually putting cash down....

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  • This comment has been deleted by the moderator

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  • Very disappointed to think a young doctor just wants to get rich by selling plastic surgery. Wasn't she trained to look after sick people?

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  • I know it's completely off topic, but I am constantly amazed to find people who have been educated to degree level, no matter what profession, who cannot spell! What has been going on in our schools?

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  • I agree..

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  • Excellent blog. Well done

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