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At the heart of general practice since 1960

Book review: 'First do no harm: Being a resilient doctor in the 21st century' by Leanne Rowe and Michael Kidd

An invaluable 'Haynes manual' for the busy medic, says Fraser Ferguson.

Building on from the paradox that more than 50% of doctors are considering leaving medical practice or reducing their hours, Leanne Rowe and Michael Kidd proceed to present what should be seen as an essential and practical guide to being a resilient doctor in the 21st century.

The book is a sort of Haynes manual for the busy medic. Like these car manuals this easy to read book is a practical handbook offering tools to successful self diagnosis and self management. Presented in a pick me up and dip in and out manner the book is broken into clearly defined chapters covering relationships with ourselves, others, families, colleagues, patients and the environment. All of these are succinctly brought together in the final chapter as a manifesto of eight principles to be better, do better and feel better.

The guidance provided is not complex but practical and clear in how it suggests you not just to identify issues but how you can make changes that will make a difference.  Positioned for doctors of all experience, this book should not be overlooked by other healthcare professionals as the issues discussed are relevant to us all as we all follow a 'first do no harm' mantra.

Fraser Ferguson is an AHP Clinical Coordinator at NHS 24

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