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Book review: NHS SOS: 'How the NHS was betrayed – and how we can save it' by Jacky Davis and Raymond Tallis

‘A book that may challenge views of a publicly funded, free at the point of access health care system’, writes Dr Suneeta Kochhar

This book is a well written, informative guide to the changes that have occurred to the NHS in recent times. The authors include a consultant radiologist, a professor of geriatric medicine, a professor of public health and a Liberal Democrat parliamentary candidate.

It details how Andrew Lansley’s Health and Social Care Act came to be passed despite strong opposition from the medical profession. Whilst those with an interest in current affairs will recognise most of the tale some of the background history may not be known. I found it particularly interesting to know the involvement of politicians and leaders of the medical profession as well as their vested interests, which were not publicised.

It is a book that may challenge views of a publicly funded, free at the point of access health care system. The book raises issues related to public versus private ownership, the effectiveness of the NHS and its positive as well as negative qualities. Moreover it expresses why the NHS is worth fighting for. It is an easy to read book that is very relevant to those who work in health care, not necessarily clinicians. It is to be commended for its passion in expressing how the NHS and the people it cares for was betrayed by those acting in their own interests.

Rating 8/10

Dr Suneeta Kochhar is a GP in East Sussex

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