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Dr Kamal Sidhu: ‘We will stop or cut down on training if we have to pay’

Dr Kamal Sidhu has experienced the financial obstacles that come with training practices first hand

Dr Kamal Sidhu

Financial reward is the very last attraction for a training practice.

After the protected teaching time, time required for the trainer to prepare for teaching, portfolio and reports, and the daily need to supervise and debrief the trainees is factored in, there is no financial benefit whatsoever. The trainers’ grant does not even cover one session of the trainer.

We have three trainees and have been asked to accommodate more, but had to decline. We train because we believe in the future of general practice and it helps us recruit and retain doctors to areas like ours where it has been extremely difficult to attract new doctors. Clearly, people sitting in Whitehall do not deal with such areas.

We will certainly have to stop or cut down on training if we have to pay in addition to the training commitment.

On one hand, we face an unprecedented recruitment crisis; on the other, signals from London are not only demoralising but destroy the very fabric of our commitment to training.

The new plans will commercialise the trainee-trainer relationship, which will be very sad. We need to encourage more practices to commit to training, not penalise them.

With an already depleted and demoralised workforce, these plans will be the basis for the demise of general practice as we know it.

Dr Kamal Sidhu is a GP trainer in Blackhall, County Durham

Read the full analysis: ‘The end of GP training as we know it’ here.

Readers' comments (7)

  • Well said Kamal (usual) but no-one listens to grass roots trainers

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  • Too many trainers will pull out if they are charged. There will then be a competitive tender process, the winner of which will be the company who are willing to supply the cheapest and worst service while absorbing any criticism. For examples of this look towards any big company providing OOH cover or other NHS contract.

    The legal profession have just convinced the department of justice that a race to bottom for legal aid lawyers does not serve defendants well, but the health ministry still perseveres with this for patients and soon GP trainees.

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  • Charging Training practice is a crazy idea !
    Charging Training practice is a calculative plan to destroy general practice.
    Let us reject this lunatic, short sighted plan of DoH.
    Where is our BMA/ RCGP ?

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  • My trainer said to me" we only wanted you in this practice to cover our annual leaves in August and September".

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  • @11:27 Yes you are actually speaking about the hidden agenda of training. Many trainers are scared of these changes as a valuable cheap asset in the form of a trainee which many have exploited in the name of training is being threatened! Look how worried they are!

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  • it works well when you have a good trainee who makes good decisions. In know a lot of trainees who needed their trainers to look at every consultation and ensure patient safety during and after each surgery, one cannot generalize on trainee or trainers but having a trainee gp can be both a boon or a bane, dependent entirely on the particular person in question.

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  • Bob Hodges

    anonymous 12:38pm

    Obviously a DoH Stooge with preconceptions.

    Go on then - call our bluff I dare you! See how many people want a trainee. We won't, and we have the Deanery course organiser at our practice.

    There's a free market coming in GP skills and labour, and it's not going to be the type of market YOU can rig.

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