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jaimie kaffash 2 duo 3x2

The Academy of Medical Royal Colleges has said patients should question their GPs about the benefits of the treatments they are being prescribed.

They mean well. Obviously, it is a good thing if patients are more knowledgeable about their care. Who knows, it may inspire them to take self-care more seriously.

Professor Dame Sue Bailey, the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges’ Choosing Wisely campaign lead, says: ‘Too often patients just accept what a doctor is telling them without question.

‘We want to change that dynamic and make sure the decision about what treatment is taken up is only made when the patient is fully informed of all the consequences.’

But I can’t help but feel as though the academy’s timing is all wrong. In an ideal world, GPs would be able to offer 20-30 minute appointments and discuss treatments with the patients that need it, so they are less likely to need unnecessary follow-up appointments .

This is not an ideal world. This is a world where BMA representatives feel compelled to vote in favour of capping the number of GP appointments to protect the ‘sanity’ of GPs.

Patients will pay heed to the advice from the academy. So when they are politely informed that the GP is unable to spare more than ten minutes, it will not help the GP or the patient.

This is indicative of the ‘ideal’ care scenarios so often espoused by high-minded organisations. Unfortunately, it has unwanted repercussions for the real world we live in.

Jaimie Kaffash is editor of Pulse

 

Readers' comments (6)

  • Ideals are never costed in block contracts

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  • Vinci Ho

    ‘In an ideal world, GPs would be able to offer 20-30 minute appointments and discuss treatments with the patients that need it, so they are less likely to need unnecessary follow-up appointments ‘

    You see
    This is exactly the argument about what these AI-smartphone-GP apps are supposed to deliver ? Are we expecting the GP working for GP at hand to spend 20 to 30 minutes for these patients??

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  • In this less than ideal world, ideally College blowhards should shut the fxxx up.

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  • Just Your Average Joe

    Professor Dame Sue Bailey, the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges’ Choosing Wisely campaign lead

    Wow just how many political favours does one need to do to buy your self into favour to be a professor and a dame?

    When was the last time she worked full time seeing patients in Primary care?????

    Very easy to make sweeping observations from lofty positions in ivory towers.

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  • I have the same problem as patients do when I have an issue with my car and take it to the garage. I have no training as a mechanic but I always ensure I ask the garage-staff whether or not the cam-shaft sensor really needs replacing.I have been told to "Fu~k Off" several times, and rightly so.

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  • Macaque

    We used to be doctor-centred and rightly now patient-centred. So I think the the Academy of Royal Medical Colleges had to be POLITICALLY CORRECT. I think they wanted to say doctors should reduce medicalising problems, cut down prescribing medicines, do less surgery, promote selfceare, lifestyle changes and please practice evidence based medicine!

    And I think this is great.

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