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Why do salaried GPs like me want partnerships?

Dr Ruth Chapman was disappointed not to have her application for a salaried post with a view to partnership taken further - but philosophical about the reasons

Dr Ruth Chapman was disappointed not to have her application for a salaried post with a view to partnership taken further - but philosophical about the reasons

I have to say that the month could have started better.

I had applied for a salaried post ‘with a view to partnership' and survived the first cull of applicants. But my application was to go no further.

After reading the practice manager's e-mail my initial response was ‘that's it I'm jacking it all in'.

However after a few minutes I decided to reflect on the fact that there were another 129 doctors who had applied for the job and were probably feeling just as rejected as I was at that moment.

Pull of partnership

Why do salaried doctors like me want partnerships?

Perhaps it's the greater control you have as a partner on your working environment or perhaps the fact that you can have a real influence on the way healthcare is delivered to patients in your area.

There is no doubt that this brings with it considerable stresses and risks of burnout but some feel that a salaried post has limited personal/career growth potential within a practice.

As a salaried GP you can sometimes feel that you are not really accepted as part of the core practice family but are more like an au pair.

Also, and this might sound like a small thing, but I would really like my own consulting room for the first time in seven years. At the moment a I feel like Thumbelina when I'm in the senior partners' room – he's very tall and when I sit in his chair my feet don't touch the ground.

Never give up

I refuse to be disheartened (and I hope the other 129 candidates feel the same), and will still keep my CV buffed up and at the ready for other job possibilities.

The good news is that at least this practice and hopefully others are obviously considering a new partner as opposed to salaried posts.

If you are unsuccessful in applying for a job bear in mind it's a buyers market at present and its not always clear what a practice is looking for.

Move on from the disappointment, work on improving your CV and its presentation and try not to take rejection personally.

As I was looking for something for a quick supper in my local supermarket, it just occurred to me that you may be a well rounded cabbage but if it's a lettuce they're after you won't be picked.

Dr Ruth Chapman is a salaried GP in south-west London. Her diary will appear monthly

Dr Ruth Chapman

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