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At the heart of general practice since 1960

Why don't we teach medical students a little, er, medicine?

Joy of joys. Proof of what any student–teaching GP realises already: most newly qualified doctors know as much about medicine as I do plate tectonics.

Joy of joys. Proof of what any student–teaching GP realises already: most newly qualified doctors know as much about medicine as I do plate tectonics.

Specifically, it seems students are not well prepared for clinical life because they lack core knowledge and skills. Nothing too important you understand, just stuff like prescribing and how to manage ill people.

I've sounded off about this in the past. Now that training is run by career educationalists, it has degenerated into a nightmare of bureaucracy, jargon and box-ticking. The only area students seem to excel in involves fluffy bits like empathy and communication. The result is they have excellent bedside manner and communicate well, but they have nothing useful to say.

Of course, being a compassionate idiot will save them from complaint to a degree, but sooner or later, they – and their patients – are going to run into trouble.

We can only hope that law training is similarly abject at present - so that the future generation of lawyers is too incompetent to sue the future generation of doctors.

Copperfield Copperfield

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