Cookie policy notice

By continuing to use this site you agree to our cookies policy below:
Since 26 May 2011, the law now states that cookies on websites can ony be used with your specific consent. Cookies allow us to ensure that you enjoy the best browsing experience.

This site is intended for health professionals only

At the heart of general practice since 1960

Your first... concern about nursing/residential home care

What should you do if you suspect that patients are being abused in nursing, residential or other types of care home? Dr Melanie Wynne-Jones gives advice

What should you do if you suspect that patients are being abused in nursing, residential or other types of care home? Dr Melanie Wynne-Jones gives advice

The retirement 'timebomb' among Asian GPs has already detonated in parts of the UK, the GPC is warning.

Problems filling GP vacancies are being reported in London, the Medway towns, Leeds, Liverpool and Bradford ­ all areas with high concentrations of Asian doctors who came to the UK in the 1960s and 1970s.

The BMA estimates one in five of the GP workforce could retire in the next two years. Recent Government statistics also reveal a fifth of singlehanded practices ­ commonly staffed by Asian GPs ­ closed last year.

More are expected to leave towards April and May next year in a bid to maximise pensions. The crisis could see PCTs increasingly tendering for private firms to fill vacancies.

The British International Doctors Association (BIDA) claims Asian doctors feel 'exploited' by the NHS, and fear working in a culture obsessed with targets and where bur-eaucracy is expected to increase as a result of the Shipman Inquiry.

In Leeds North-East PCT, two recent resignations by Asian GPs have contributed

to an 'acute' workload crisis.

Dr John Adams, PCT professional executive chair, said patients were being distributed among other practices, despite high list sizes and some 'clinical governance concerns'.

GPC negotiator Dr Rich-ard Vautrey, a GP in Leeds, said the problem in the city highlighted the start of a retirement timebomb that had been dreaded for 30 to 40 years.

'We've been concerned about the situation in Chapeltown for a while now,' he said. 'But we shouldn't single it out ­ it reflects the wider problem of recruitment in urban areas.'

Dr Rubin Minhas, a GP in Gillingham, Kent, and regional patron of the South Asian Health Foundation, said Medway PCT was already looking at salaried GP and nurse-led practices as alternatives.

'We have a large number of singlehanded Asian GPs ready to retire,' he said.

Dr Kambiz Boomla, chair of City and East London LMC, said there were already 'huge' recruitment problems for PCTs and doctors were less inclined to become partners.

'This creates a bit of a crisis ­ how do you recruit the new generation who build up practices?' he said.

By Rob Finch

Rate this article 

Click to rate

  • 1 star out of 5
  • 2 stars out of 5
  • 3 stars out of 5
  • 4 stars out of 5
  • 5 stars out of 5

0 out of 5 stars

Have your say