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GP leaders to vote on support for fully salaried GP profession

The GPC could negotiate a new contract with Government under which GPs give up their independent contractor status and all go salaried, LMCs have suggested.

A motion to be presented by Oxfordshire LMC at the emergency LMC Conference at the end of the month suggests that because ‘many younger GPs currently prefer to be salaried rather than partners’, the GPC should look at ‘future contractual models’ which ‘explore all options including movement away from independent contractor status’.

Although the Oxfordshire LMC motion is the only one scheduled for debate, several LMCs suggested similar motions to the agenda committee.

This included Mid Mersey LMC, which proposed a motion saying ‘that the days of independent contractors delivering safe and sustainable general practice are coming to an end and calls upon the GPC to actively support the development of a salaried GP service’.

LMCs have voted on the topic before but the motion to move to a fully salaried service has always been voted down.

A Pulse survey of over 600 GPs last autumn found that support for a fully salaried model of general practice is growing, with 26% now in favour. However just over half, 54%, remained opposed. 

The motion follows similar calls by former RCGP chair Professor Clare Gerada and NHS England in London, while NHS Hull CCG has also looked into plans for developing a fully salaried model - which it later discarded,

GPs in Scotland are already moving ‘as close as possible’ to a salaried service as part of the devolved health economy’s new contract model.

The motion in full

OXFORDSHIRE: That conference believes that many younger GPs currently prefer to be salaried rather than partners, and that in looking at future contractual models, the GPC Executive Team should explore all options including movement away from independent contractor status.

Read the agenda in full here

Readers' comments (57)

  • Another Hunt agenda to destroy General Practice totally. I think the people in LMC are as far from reality as Jeremy Hunt is from the NHS. If NHS goes to the salaried model, they would collapse within a week. Sickness, defined hours, defined paperwork, defined home visits etc. They still don't realise partners are the cheapest workforce. Don't get me wrong- I would happily give up my partnership and become a locum- earning 100 pounds per hour, when the system is in desparate need for GPs, for the work leftover by the SALARED GPs.
    I'm sorry, I might be out of work- because when the private compaines take over, with Hunt as their MD- they won't give a s**it about the patients not being seen.
    I'm worried and so should the people be- Only one thing left to say if it happens- Australia- here I come.

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  • Way to go. Ask your local CCG what it is paying interim managers. You may well find it is much more than you earn. Because they are in short supply, they charge the Earth and the NHS pays it.

    Ditch the contract comrades!

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  • @ Anon 5:18

    £100/hour + is what I currently charge and im fully booked for three months. Wake up and smell the coffee people! Simple maths, one partner quitting= work for 3 or 4 locums. Dont listen to your fear of the unknown and oh continuity of care shit and just DO IT.

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  • Lol at "continuity of care" (6.50)

    I hate continuity of care. Yet more BS sold to us by our seniors. Along with the c**p about how home visits are great because you get to see how the patient lives.

    Continuity = Heartsink I could do without.

    Has anyone seen my cardigan? I seem to have mislaid it.

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  • This won't change a thing ..its window dressing
    General practice is under funded, over stretched and dumped on by anybody and everybody

    A turd on a plate with a salad garnish is still a turd

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  • Anon@7.03
    Continuity of care is valued by patients (once they find a doctor in whom they have confidence, of course) and enables more effective use of GP time because you don't have to start from scratch with every patient at every consultation. Moreover, a build-up of trust means that patients are more likely to accept advice/diagnosis having been treated well in the past and the doctor is in a better position to assess likely significance of woolly symptoms.

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  • 5:18PM you are wrong. Hospital staff are salaried too and work well beyond their duty of care to make up for the shortages. Working as a salaried GP is the same - you act like a buffer.

    The only way you will truly be in-control of your workload is when you set the terms i.e. locumming.

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  • BTW - I support a fully locum GP profession.

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  • With the amount of responsibility and liability resting in the GP sector, it would be too toxic for the government or indeed large private providers to take a bite out of.

    I think this motion input forward by some old cardigans looking to inflate the value of the premises they own upon their retirement.

    If think if the GP's do go salaried, there will be a lot of fun to be had for people who actually know how the system works from the inside.

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  • @ Anonymous | GP Partner15 Jan 2016 8:37pm

    Thanks for the lecture. If you hadn't realised I am not interested in these clichés even if there is some validity in them. I have been practising for over 15 years and can draw my own conclusions.
    So called continuity has many facets in General Practice including cosiness and cronyism which lead to GP compromise, favouritism, inequity and a lack of objectivity. It often means that patients keep seeing the same doctor in the practice because they like them, regardless of other expertise that other doctors have in the practice specific to their needs. Worst of all is the doctor dependency “continuity” brings which often suits certain patient and doctor types who end up meeting regularly and achieving little or nothing other than some sort of emotional fix.
    Yes, continuity for a particular episode of care has some benefits but on balance I can live without it thanks.

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