Cookie policy notice

By continuing to use this site you agree to our cookies policy below:
Since 26 May 2011, the law now states that cookies on websites can ony be used with your specific consent. Cookies allow us to ensure that you enjoy the best browsing experience.

This site is intended for health professionals only

At the heart of general practice since 1960

BMA oppose £180 cap on fees for whiplash reports

Plans to cap the amount GPs can charge for producing initial whiplash reports at £180 is a ‘false economy’ and will lead to more cases going to court, says the BMA.

The plans by the Ministry of Justice will come into effect in October and are part of a crackdown on whiplash claims and insurance fraud.

But the BMA contest that the cap doesn’t accurately reflect the work involved in producing a report and say doctors will be discouraged from undertaking the work.

They advocate a range of fixed fees for each part of compiling the a whiplash report, which requires a doctor to interview and examine claimants, produce a study of GP and hospital notes, and dictate and correct the final report.

In a joint letter to the MoJ, BMA medico-legal committee chair Jan Wise and Deborah Evans, chief executive of the Association of Personal Injury Lawyers, say a robust reporting system will combat fraud and save money and court time.

They argue for a range of fixed fees for each part of compiling a whiplash report, which requires a doctor to interview and examine claimants, produce a study of GP and hospital notes, and dictate and correct the final report.

They write: ‘We would advise against sacrificing quality for false economy.’

‘There are several factors to consider when setting a fixed fee and this should include time to review the GP record of the patient, examination of the patient, writing the report, dealing with written and phone enquiries and running costs.’  

‘The £180 fee does not provide the expert sufficient time to carry all of the above duties.’

Readers' comments (4)

  • and I am sure the legal profession will except a cap on their fees............................

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • The government have already tried that one and No, they didn't!
    That's why a big financial trial had to be called off for lack of a suitable defence barrister prepared to do the work for the specified fee.
    Good on them.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • I think it is strange that when the BMA used to set standard fees for private work they were told that it was inappropriate and against competition rules.

    But now the government thinks it is acceptable to set fees nationally.

    DOI: I do not do these assessments - but if I did would probably walk away if offered less that what I felt appropriate.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • don't worry BMA will fold as they always do

    there will be some excuse that it may affect a single patient in Woking and we wouldn't want that.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say