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Your views on the salaried GP contract debate

Many GPs have written to Pulse and left comments on pulsetoday.co.uk about the issue of the salaried GP contract and whether partners are giving their salaried colleagues a rough deal. Here's what you've been saying. Leave your comment at the bottom to add to the debate.

Many GPs have written to Pulse and left comments on pulsetoday.co.uk about the issue of the salaried GP contract and whether partners are giving their salaried colleagues a rough deal. Here's what you've been saying. Leave your comment at the bottom to add to the debate.



As a salaried GP working in practice with 2 GP partners, I feel under-valued and exploited within the practice team.

I have not had a pay-rise since I took up the post 4 years ago and it is a struggle to get any study-leave. I recently self-funded a course myself because it is a hindrance to even ask for any help or subsidy for funding.

GP partners who employ salaried GPs have no incentive to offer them better prospects and for the partners it's a win-win situation where they get a greater share in profits. The lack of GP vacancies now greatly concerns me and I now feel trapped in a job that I feel immensely unrewarding.

In my opinion, salaried GP's should get compulsory option to become a partner after a specified agreed duration in employment. I feel that salaried GP's are now second-rate to locums - locums are self-employed and have more autonomy and for these reasons, I am considering resignation in order to pursue a career as a locum.
name and address supplied

It 's a pity that GPs have always been their own worst enemies through greed. At a time when it is clear that the Government wants to bring general practice down and threaten GPs through divide and rule, GP practices have re enforced that by descriminating against their colleagues. First they foreclosed the prospects of others becoming partners, now they want to starve them. It 's a shame.
Dr A Ugwudike

There has always been a big differential between fulltime principles and salaried partners and with salaried partners increasing in numbers its bound to come to a head.
Dr Gerald H J Hancocks

I feel very strongly about the two tier system. I am increasingly of the opinion that the some partners especially those on PMS contracts, behave worse than the private sector.

Some salaried GPs employed by PMS surgeries only receive the statutory sick pay [SSP] ie 75.40 per week. PMS practices are meant to adhere to the BMA model contract. However, although it is binding / enforceable for GMS and PCO employers, it is not so for PMS. This is a real loop hole which seems to be increasingly exploited by some surgeries.

My suspicion is that within the developing two tier system, some salaried GPs do not know, do not read the contract or are too shy or afraid to demand at least some sort of occupational sick pay. I find this practice appalling.

I wonder how the PMS practices can get away with this and why this is to date not legally enforceable, either via BMA / GPC negotiators or via PCTs as part of quality measures etc..

Basically one could argue that some PMS practices are behaving exactly like or worse than the declared enemy, the big commercial co-operations or APMS.
Dr Rene Spallek

I think they have every right to look after their profits. Therefore Salaried GPs are an easy target.
Dr. Mehar Singh

I have reason to believe that practices are being financially squeezed and consequently partners' pay is decreasing.

If that is so then transparent sharing with the salaried colleague should lead to a mutually agreed reappriasal of salary. BUT the reverse must also apply when or if practice finances improve so should the pay of salaried GPs.

Transparency and integrity is the answer
Geoffrey Norris

There is a widening gap between pay of partners and salaried doctors. Partners reap the reward/profit for the input provided by salaried GPs without any consideration of even rewarding the salaried doctor.
Dr Georgia Whyte

The partners have the whip hand these days and other GPs have to get what work they can where they can. Times are so uncertain in so many ways. It is an uneven playing field and very difficult for young GPs starting out.
Dr Maura Murphy

Pulse team blog - your views on the salaried/partner debate

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