Cookie policy notice

By continuing to use this site you agree to our cookies policy below:
Since 26 May 2011, the law now states that cookies on websites can ony be used with your specific consent. Cookies allow us to ensure that you enjoy the best browsing experience.

This site is intended for health professionals only

At the heart of general practice since 1960

Children should drink water to tackle obesity, vitamin D supplements to treat high blood pressure, and TV watching may double risk of early death

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines on Thursday 26 June.

Children should be given only water to drink with meals to help tackle the obesity crisis, the BBC reports.

Nutritional scientist have said sugary drinks were empty calories and people had got ‘out of the habit of drinking water’ with meals.

The call comes as Public Health England prepares to publish its plans for cutting the nation’s sugar intake.

Meanwhile, the Independent reports that vitamin D supplements might be a cheap and effective way to treat high blood pressure, a study by scientists published in The Lancet medical journal has revealed.

In the study, scientists were able to determine whether low levels of vitamin D had a causal link with high blood pressure more reliably than ever before, by measuring genetic variations which affect a person’s vitamin D levels, and measuring them against blood pressure.

Meanwhile, the Telegraph reports that watching three hours or more television each day may double the risk of early death compared with people who watch one or less - even if you are young and healthy, a study suggests.

Researchers followed more than 13,000 university graduates for an average of 8.2 years and discovered that those who spent hours glued to the box were more likely to die young.

 

 

Have your say