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Ebola vaccine setback, 3,000 breast cancer cases could be prevented and men are stupider than women

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines

A trial testing a vaccine for Ebola has been halted because some of the patients experienced pains in their hands and feet, the Guardian reports.

The trial, which involves 59 patients, is expected to restart on 5 January in about 15 volunteers after in investigations have completed to check that the side effects are temporary. 

Sierra Leone has had the most cases of Ebola in West Africa, at 7,897, since the outbreak started. The World Health Organisation said that across just 11 days ‘two teams buried 87 bodies, including a nurses, an ambulance driver and a janitor drafted in to removing bodies as they piled up’.

GPs could prevent 3,000 breast cancer cases a year if they gave out Tamoxifen more freely, research highlighted by the Daily Mail claim.

A study of 7,154 high risk women found that those given Tamoxifen every day for five years in the 1990s were 38% less likely to have developed breast cancer. Lead research Jack Cuzick, from the University of London, said: ‘There’s a major cultural shift which the profession needs to embrace.’

Men are more stupid than women, according to a 20-year review conducted by academics, the Daily Telegraph reports.

The reviewers, whose work is published in the British Medical Journal, conducted a study of the Darwin Awards, an annual review of the most foolish way that people have died.

One man hitched a ride home after linking a shopping trolley to the back of a train and was dragged two miles, while another shot himself in the head with a ‘spy pen’ weapon to show his friend it was real. Of 318 ‘valid’ cases 88.7% were male, the researchers found.

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