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GPs call for asthma training, 'spare tyre' dementia risk and the NHS rich list is revealed

Our round-up of the health headlines on Tuesday 3 May.

By Laura Passi

Our round-up of the health headlines on Tuesday 3 May.

A Telegraph investigation has named 'at least 660 NHS managers who earn more than the Prime Minister.' So that's always fun to look at. Top of the list is interim chief executive of Monitor, David Bennett, earning £282,500 from March 2010 to February 2011.

Other famous names include, in third place, London Strategic Health Authority chief executive Ruth Carnall on £277,500, commissioning tsar Dame Barbara Hakin on £227,500 in 13th place and, rather surprisingly, in 29th place is NHS chief executive Sir David Nicholson on £212,500.

The Observer reported the new EU rules that came into force at the weekend banning hundreds of herbal remedies and meaning that all herbal medicines will have to be registered and marked with a logo THR. This means that they will have to meet safety requirements and list exact dosages and possible side effects. Common herbal remedies - such as echinacea, St John's wort and valerian - are already registered.

A survey by Asthma UK is reported in the Metro and Independent today that shows that just under two-thirds of GPs feel 'public awareness of asthma could be improved, while 47% admitted their own knowledge was lacking.' It also shows that 'half of GPs think that the number of deaths could be reduced with better care.'

The Daily Mail reports the research from Sweden has found that 'piling on the pounds in middle-age pushes up your chances of developing Alzheimers by 80 per cent'. the newspaper says 'losing the spare tyre' is the best way to avoid 'mental decline in later years'.

The researchers drew these conclusions after analysing information from 8,500 twins aged 65 plus, over 30 years. Dr Weili Xu, study author at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, said: 'Our results contribute to the growing evidence that controlling body weight or losing weight in middle age could reduce your risk of dementia'.

Spotted a story we've missed? Let us know in the comments and we'll update the digest throughout the day...

Daily digest

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