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GPs urged to screen for genital mutilation, pre-eclampsia blood test and why you should have breakfast this morning

A round-up of the health news headlines on Tuesday 5 November.

The Herald Scotland reports a blood test for pre-eclampsia could save ‘hundreds of babies’ lives’. Developed by British scientists at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust in Central London and King’s College London, the blood test is reported to give a result in 15 minutes and can identify 96% of women at high risk of the condition.

According to the BBC this morning ‘nurses, midwives and GPs’ must start screening for genital mutilation and treat it as child abuse. This comes after a report published by several royal colleges and health visitors representatives. It contained an estimate of 66,000 women in the UK affected by genitalmutilation. Earlier this year a helpline set up by the NSPCC received over 100 inquiries in its first three months, reports the BBC ‘resulting in 38 referrals to the police’ and former director of public prosecutions, Keir Starmer, said that it was ‘only a matter of time’ before criminal charges are held against the perpetrators.

And finally - did you have breakfast today? If not you may be putting yourself in ‘grave danger’ according to the Daily Mail. A Harvard School of Public Health study found that men who don’t have breakfast are 27% more likely to suffer heart attacks or heart disease, as missing the meal put an ‘extra strain’ on the body.

The article goes on to list the best things to eat for breakfast (porridge with honey, boiled egg and toast), dispel a few myths (having breakfast doesn’t mean you’ll eat less for lunch though) and looks at the link between morning hunger and genes.


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