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GPs to be trained in 'leadership' and redesigning services

GPs will be given protected time away from their usual duties to receive training in leadership and redesigning services, Scottish health secretary Shona Robison has said.

From 2017 GPs in Scotland will have a revised role as ‘senior clinical decision maker in the community,’ focusing on ‘complex care, whole system quality improvement and undifferentiated presentations.’

The plans are part of the Scottish Government’s A National Clinical Strategy for Scotland, aimed at improving healthcare over the next 10-15 years.

There will be a focus on delivering care closer to patients’ homes, improving outcomes through clinicians working across more than one hospital, plus investment in e-health and other technologies.

Ms Robison wants to see the planning and delivery of care to take place increasingly around GP practices, with GPs focusing on dealing with complex cases, and providing expert assessments of new cases.

The strategy states: ‘The proposal that GPs become more involved in complex care and system-wide quality improvement activities will require a refocusing of GP activity.

It is expected that GPs will be less involved in the more routine tasks and provide an opportunity for other health professions in the practice and the wider community team to work to the top of their licence i.e taking on roles that their professional training has prepared them for.

’To achieve this, the training needs of GPs, members of the wider practice healthcare team, and other professionals working across primary care, will need to be considered, and where necessary developed and met.’

Former GP Dr Angus Cameron led the development of the strategy.

 

 

 

Readers' comments (9)

  • Hasntgotacluism

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  • remove 'ed' from redesigning!

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  • Good Luck with this current buzz phase of "working to the top of our licence". I like the idea of other health professionals doing this and i will be happy to step up to this as a GP unfortunately i can't see this will work unless significant training plans for AHP as they will not be able to cope with the uncertainties of clinical care nor the responsibilities. The elephant in the room is the patient responsibility and expectation also.

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  • When will they just let doctors doctor?
    @5.06 lol

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  • The excitement is getting the better of me."Focusing on complex care,whole system quality improvement,and undifferentiated presentations".Apart from the fact that I deal with 40 undifferentiated presentations daily,sweat buckets over dealing with complex care and with any spare time that is left(precious little) I attempt whole system guality improvement,I still look forward to getting time away to be instructed in these fine arts.However I have no idea where the time will come from to deal with the mountain of paperwork generated every day
    All of this ,designed of course,to take pressures off hospital based services in spite of a 3 percent or so reduction in primary care services and a burgeoning post discharge workload coming from primary care.
    Sorry but the figures don,t add up to me.Unless this whole concept is appropriately funded it will fall flat very quickly and HSCPs will be a miserable failure
    Unfortunately if things keep deteriorating in general practice,ANPs will be required to do bog standard GP work any there will be precious few if any GPs to help the Government to keep "bed blockers" out of hospital as they have been pejoratively called with increasing vociferousness in the last few years.

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  • The only hope for the GP profession is to be rid of constant interference and control by their political paymasters.

    GPs must quit the NHS and go private. If you don't, the micro-management meddling by these teenage clueless know-it-all politicians must only get worse and worse.

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  • It is like this . If we stay as GPs under the NHS, then we will be expected to do everything for almost nothing. [ take home pay at moment per consult is 3 pounds].
    If I was the health secretary anywhere in the UK, I must get the best value per pound from GPs and other NHS workers.
    That is my brief.
    It really depends on GPs if they want to work for what is offered. There is no point us GPs complaining constantly.
    Either we work for the NHS or we dont. [ I used to do overtime at 30 pence per hour 35 years ago = ? 3 pound per hour now]
    So that is it in a nutshell. We can work as directed for what they offer or we can walk away.
    That is up to us. Nobody is holding a gun o our heads.

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  • "Former GP Dr Angus Cameron led the development of the strategy."

    Says it all.

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  • Insightless goobledygook from she who denied the GP staffing crisis only last summer. They are now sending press gangs to the antipodes to get GPs back.
    For 'working to top of their licence' read 'every last drop of blood will be squeezed out of the exsanguinated stone that is GP'.
    How can she or anyone else involved in this double-speak nonsense not realise that GPs have been 'senior clinical decision makers in the community' since at least 1948?
    If this kind of irritating BS TQM reality evasion was designed to attract GPs back or improve recruitment and retention...no chance.

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