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At the heart of general practice since 1960

39. Dr Stuart Sutton

He may not be a familiar name to many, but Dr Stuart Sutton is a young GP to watch. Currently a GP registrar in Newham, east London, he has been chair of the RCGP’s associates in training committee since November 2011 and co-chair of GLADD (Gay and Lesbian Association of Doctors and Dentists) since 2009.

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He may not be a familiar name to many, but Dr Stuart Sutton is a young GP to watch. Currently a GP registrar in Newham, east London, he has been chair of the RCGP's associates in training committee since November 2011 and co-chair of GLADD (Gay and Lesbian Association of Doctors and Dentists) since 2009.

One of our panel predicted he will ‘go places' – and he certainly has had a productive year, helping the RCGP successfully present its case for extended GP training.

He has also conducted a survey into GP trainees' preparedness for commissioning and has been working with the RCGP's assessment team to analyse why there are differences between candidate's performances on the MRCGP examination.

He says the work the college put into opposing the health bill was a ‘defining moment' for him: ‘It showed great courage and a commitment to doing what is right and not what is popular with the government of the day.'

He is also continuing his work leading GLADD, supporting lesbian, gay and bisexual doctors and helping develop guidance with the BMA and the GMC.

He says: ‘Although many "out" LGB doctors have very positive experiences in the workplace, many still feel unable to be "out" at work and some have experienced direct discrimination.'

In his spare time, he takes long walks next to the Thames, is planning his civil partnership in the next few months and is a keen tweeter (follow him @StuSutton).

He says: ‘The power of professional social networking is incredible. I've made new contacts, learned from colleagues, taken on a mentee and been offered work – all through Twitter.'

His next challenge, though, is to qualify and find a job.

‘I'm looking forward to spending more time in the consulting room and with patients,' he says.

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