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It's D-Day for Lansley's health bill

Our roundup of health news headlines on Wednesday 19 January.

By Gareth Iacobucci

Our roundup of health news headlines on Wednesday 19 January.

The papers are awash with the health bill this morning, as they gear up for the unveiling of Andrew Lansley's controversial legislation this afternoon.

The Mail focusses on how NHS patients will be able to get free treatment from public or private providers, as long as it meets NHS standards and doesn't cost the taxpayer more.

The Guardian has never held back in giving Lansley both barrels, and doesn't break with tradition this morning. The paper reports on the findings of a report from the Nuffield Trust, that suggests Mr Lansley's NHS shakeup could turn patients against GPs because doctors are likely to start receiving 'unpalatable' cash bonuses.

The Labour-supporting Mirror also piles in, with an investigation claiming to show that the private health bosses set to profit from Lansley's nhs shake-up are also party donors.

The paper also carries NHS chief executive Sir David Nicholson's warning that free-for-all competition could lead to a dramatic drop in the standard of patient care.

Even sections of the Tory press give Lansley's reforms a lukewarm reception, as the Telegraph also references Nicholson's comments in its preview of the bill.

Lots too on statins this morning, with the Telegraph reporting that up to three million people are taking them needlessly, with the treatment ineffective in many cases.

But the biggest news of the day comes in the Mail, which reports on new research which shows finally provides proof that man flu exists (apparently). It appears that the working man is much more likely to succumb to a cold than his female colleague when the pressure's on. Amen brothers.

Spotted a story we've missed? Let us know, and we'll update the digest throughout the day...

Daily Digest

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