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Government to end 'one-size-fits-all' NHS Health Checks

Health secretary Matt Hancock has announced an overhaul of NHS Health Checks in a bid to put an end to ‘one-size-fits-all’ check-ups.

At the launch of a review into NHS Health Checks, which Pulse reported in July, Mr Hancock said he hoped to create a more tailored check-up in order to better prevent and predict diseases.

NHS Health Checks are a standardised check-up currently offered to everyone between the ages of 40 and 74, and commissioned by the local council.

Under new plans, the checks will be more tailored depending on factors such as age, location and their DNA. For example, drinking advice might be targeted towards 40-49-year-olds, and blood pressure advice to those between 70-74-years-old.

Those at low risk of cardiovascular disease may be offered less frequent, online check-ups.

The review will also look at a specific check-up for those approaching retirement age and ways to maximise uptake.

Of the 14 million people offered an NHS Health Check over the past five years, 7 million have undertaken one. The Department of Health and Social Care claims that out of these, 500 lives have been saved each year.

Mr Hancock said: ‘Personalised, preventative healthcare is a mission critical to the future-fit healthcare service we want to build. We must harness the latest technology and techniques to move away from the one-size-fits-all approach of the past.

‘The review we are announcing today will be an important step towards achieving that, helping us to find data-led, evidenced based ways to support people to spot, manage and prevent risks to their health through targeted intervention.’

Duncan Selbie, Public Health England chief executive, said: ‘Predictive prevention becomes ever more possible through genomics and the application of cutting-edge behavioural science.

‘NHS Health Checks have been phenomenally successful and this review is a great opportunity to make the next generation the most effective in the world.’

The proposals follow plans by DHSC to make screening as a whole more 'tailored'. 

It comes as GPs warned genomic testing in five million patients could worsen GP workforce problems. 

Readers' comments (9)

  • matt 'nero' hancock does like to fiddle as the NHS......He prefers h to n!

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  • About time!

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  • So either they weren’t evidence based and should have been scrapped ages ago or they are and this is cost cutting? It’s ok, as long as a policy has great sound bites everything will be ok.....

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  • save far more money and lives by banning smoking - just saying

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  • Vinci Ho

    Mr Hancock said: ‘Personalised, preventative healthcare is a mission critical to the future-fit healthcare service we want to build. We must harness the latest technology and techniques to move away from the one-size-fits-all approach of the past.......’


    OMG
    I am so ecstatic that a health secretary actually knows the meaning of ‘one-size-fits-all’ (OSFA, well, you can interpret that FA(all) differently😆😂🤪). Well done , Robocop!

    Then again , there is a punch line , though , called ‘technology’
    Welcome Babylonians and AI, 😆

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  • Would love to see some evidence to support this programme.....

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  • Dear All,
    Come on cut him some slack. The program alongside the annual Flu fiasco is known to be a complete waste of time effort and money. He's unlikely to say that in public, but this is undoubtedly a move in the right direction. Lets just see how much they stick to the evidence.
    Regards
    Paul C

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  • Always worth googling the 'other voices' who 'chip in' when the minister speaks.

    Have a look at Duncan Selbie's Wikipedia entry (Public Health England chief executive).

    He 'joined the NHS as a teenager'. According to Wikipedia he claims no special public health knowledge. He earns just south of £190K each year.

    The key skills required for this post?

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  • 500 lives saved a year - evidence please (and for how any years) ? cost/QALY

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