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NAPC joins forces with NHS Confederation

The National Association of Primary Care is to merge with the NHS Confederation to become its primary care provider network.

The NAPC, which promotes clinical commissioning, will join the NHS Confederation over a transition period up to April 2015.

The confederation, which this month appointed Rob Webster as its new chief executive following the resignation of Mike Farrar, represents NHS commissioning organisations and trusts across the UK.

Earlier this year, the NHS Confederation appointed Dr Johnny Marshall – the former chair of the NAPC – as its head of policy.

NAPC chair Dr Charles Alessi, also a GP in south London, said: ‘The opportunity for greater organisation and innovation within primary care, both at home and abroad, as an integral part of the local care system has never been greater or more pressing.’

‘The NHS Confederation provides the right platform for us to act as the exclusive vehicle for primary care provision. This will allow us to expand our membership base and increase our influence and effectiveness in all area of our work.’

NHS Confederation chief operating officer Matt Tee said: ‘We envisage this collaboration as an opportunity to further widen the diversity of primary care providers within the NAPC and to ensure that they have a central role to play within our membership in shaping innovative care provision.’

The agreement will not have effect NHS Clinical Commissioners, which the NAPC is a member of, the two bodies said.

Readers' comments (1)

  • Well done to both the NAPC ( Charles) and NHS Confed (Johnny). This builds on Mike Farrar's vision of the NHS Confed representing both managers and clinician networks and organisations.

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