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CCG to make £35 million saving through ‘GP collaborative working’ by 2020

A CCG plans to save £35 million by 2020/21 through GP ‘collaborative working’, according to its ‘sustainability and transformation plan’.

NHS Salford CCG says in its sustaintability and transformation plan (STP) savings include £7.6 million from emergency care admissions, £5 million from a reduction in planned hospital admissions and £1 million from a reduction in admissions to care homes.

The plan also includes a ‘medicines optimisation’ scheme which will see a £2.5 million saving in cost increases from tackling primary care prescribing.

However, local leaders said there is little detail around what ‘collaborative working’ means.

NHS bosses told all areas in December last year to submit the STPs outlining how they will ensure health services, including primary care, are ‘sustainable’. All plans have to be submitted in June, but NHS Salford CCG is one of the first to make theirs public as it is part of the wider Greater Manchester plan. 

A spokesman for NHS Salford CCG said that its approach was to invest in community-based care and cost savings would come from hospital-based care but added that it had not yet been decided whether GPs in the area would receive extra funding under the new plans.

The spokesman said: ‘Whether this means more money for GPs is under discussion.’

GPC lead Dr Richard Vautrey said: ‘GPs will be concerned that history will just repeat itself and so called efficiency savings in secondary care will simply be made by passing the work to general practice without the funding to make that sustainable.

’This pass the parcel game where the music always stops with the workload in the lap of GPs has led to the current crisis in general practice and is reflected in the anger we’ve seen expressed at the LMC conference.’

Local GPs told Pulse that the plan did not make It clear exactly what ‘collaborative working’ meant.

Former Salford LMC lead Dr Iain Maclean told Pulse: ‘I suspect that “collaborative working” means different things to different people, depending upon their agenda,’

Readers' comments (9)

  • Ha Ha Ha , they will save plenty when GPs are collaboratively working for nothing.

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  • The CCG has been on the magic fairy dust again methinks.
    In my own practice I have lowered my threshold for referral in the face of spirally legal scrutiny, unfettered demand and a persistent and pernicious failure to raise funding with GP workload. Besides I need to spend a few hours each day looking at what medico legal disasterous 'handovers' secondary care have left for 'gp to sort' without telling the patient.

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  • Store this CCG plan in the section marked "fiction", for that's all it is. Those who came up with it can collect their good appraisals and get promoted to another place for coming up with this "plan" so by the time the savings have failed to materialise someone else will be in place and can say "not my fault".

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  • Avoid the middleman put this rubbish in the shredder then use it to light the fire might be a bit more use that way.

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  • Watching Simon and Jeremy in front of the Commons Health Select Committee, Simon said that it was expected that secondary care would have to make savings and not primary care. So hospitals will be expected to make staff redundant and some of these savings would be put into primary care and the rest kept by the Treasury...all by 2020

    I can't see this happening at all...making Consultants redundant!, stopping sub-specialisation of hospital care e.g. just one stop Gen Medicine out-patients instead of endocrinology, neurology, gastroenterology, hepatology, Parkinson disease clinics..not likely, particularly as there will be no GPs left to do the work anyhow

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  • I have to point out some of the commentators are being unfair.

    CCGs are not given a choice on if it wants to make savings. It gets told by DoH to make £X savings and submit plans on how to do this, no matter how unachievable it is. As you can see from the above article, time scale is ridiculously short (6 months to form a group, make management structures, finance the changes, agree on T&C choosing population footprint of 2-3 million with no prior detail us just not doable).

    Failure to adhere to DoH instruction? Request (think godfather "I'm gonna make you an offer you can't refuse" scene) for a recovery plan and failing this, a turn around procedure to replace the existing board structures with new ones who's only intention is to bring the CCG in line with NHS business plan. Done at the expense of the CCG and to the detriment of the local health economy.

    So either way, CCG had no choice. Some of you guys need to realize DoH plan has always been to cause division between the GPs. Blaming the CCGs will only Jeremy Hunt & Co. happier......

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  • I don't think anyone is really saying they blame the CCG's, who are just carrying out their master's wishes. We all know that it is the government (Osborne) that is driving austerity.

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  • OK folks, so its fictional. BUT - it involves REAL CASH being given to primary care for outcomes no one is sure can be achieved. Think of it like a DES (say, AuA for example) and do what you have to. The CCG will fail either way, but the cash injection might enable you to hold on a little longer, or invest in change

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  • When will they learn that the NHS is too big and complex to make any prediction like this. Factors which no-one has thought of will come into play and wreck it. Presumably the authors will have long since departed by that time.

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