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University appoints GP to lead new medical school

A part-time GP is to head up the University of Sunderland’s new medical school when it opens next year.

Professor Scott Wilkes, a professor of general practice and primary care at the university and a part-time GP in North Tyneside, will oversee the new school’s teaching, research and engagement with local NHS organisations.

The medical school at the University of Sunderland, which is set to open in September 2019, is one of five new medical schools to launch across England as part of efforts to boost training places by 1,500 by 2020.

According to the university, trainee doctors are anticipated to specialise largely in general practice or psychiatry, which may help to address the chronic shortage of doctors in the north east.

The university already delivers clinical education in pharmacy, nursing, paramedic practice and biomedical science.

Professor Wilkes said: ‘I’m honoured and thrilled to lead the school of medicine. I have every confidence that the school will build on Sunderland’s existing strengths to deliver the clinical training necessary to support the highest quality of health care.'

Professor Wilkes has spent more than 10 years leading the primary care specialty group for the NIHR Clinical Research Network, North East and North Cumbria. He is also a member of the Society for Academic Primary Care.

Professor Michael Young, deputy vice-chancellor (academic), said: ‘Scott’s impressive achievements over his 30-plus year career made him the ideal candidate to lead our school of medicine and deliver outstanding teaching and research that will have a real impact on the region’s health and wellbeing.’

 

Readers' comments (11)

  • Took Early Retirement

    Good luck to him but.....er.... he's NOT a GP in the way 99% of us understand it.

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  • What Now?

    According to the university, trainee doctors are anticipated to specialise largely in general practice or psychiatry, which may help to address the chronic shortage of doctors in the north east.

    I wonder if the medical students
    are aware of this?

    Not sure if General Practice as we know it will still be around by the time they graduate?

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  • I understand the 'ambition' to train GPs and psychiatrists was part of the application process to allow them to have a medical school (or more medical student places). It is however politically driven and truly awful for the process of medical education.

    I, like many others changed career choice after graduating. I think it is just about possible to be clear that you want to do medicine at the age of 18, but impossible to tell the difference between different specialties you really know nothing about. For example I thought academic work was interesting and driven, but now see that it is full of politics, funding crises and bullying...

    I think it is unfair to try and limit students choices at the stage of applying to a medschool - which means it is unfair to have medical school places earmarked for certain specialties.

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  • One needs to ask in this toxic practice climate why enter medicine if you've got the grades.

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  • I agree Truth Finder. If your smart enough to get into medicine you are smart enough to do something worthwhile.

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  • That's sad to read - "If your smart enough to get into medicine you are smart enough to do something worthwhile."
    They've turned a career and/or vocation into a job - and a poor one at that.

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  • ridiculous to suggest that people are being pigeon holed into a certain specialty before graduating. The proper thing is to make those areas more popular then then the problem will sort itself.

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  • Watchdoc that too much common sense for an insane politically driven NHS establishment.

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  • Great news for Sunderland medical graduates then. Oxford and Cambridge will be proud to call them colleagues and will definitely treat them as equals!

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  • Hogwash indeed, trying to split crafts is total lunacy, a medical degree is a medical degree and no doubt the bright young things may realise this!

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