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RCN calls for new NHS pay deal to extend to GP practice nurses

The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) is calling for the NHS pay deal to be extended to nursing staff across the NHS and social care, including those working in general practice.

Today, the nurses' representative body said it formally backs the Government-proposed deal, after 77% of members voted in favour of proposals.

The deal, which currently does not extend to GP staff as they are not on Agenda for Change contracts, would see affected staff receive a pay rise of between 6.5-22% over three years.

Having announced the vote, RCN chief executive and general secretary Janet Davies said: 'We will turn our campaigning fire on getting this pay rise extended to nursing staff in other parts of the NHS and social care too.

'The care sector already suffers from high staff turnover and so pay must be boosted there too if we are to prevent a nursing exodus for better paid jobs in hospitals and the community.'

The Treasury has committed to fully fund the deal for the next three years with an extra £4.2bn and pledged to match this funding level in the three other countries of the UK.

In Scotland and Wales, pay negotiations are subsequently underway but the absence of government in Northern Ireland means the increase will be delayed.

The deal is expected to receive final approval at a meeting of unions, the NHS and Government on 27 June. After this, a formal communication will be sent to NHS employers to begin paying the higher amount in July pay packets.

The raise applies to the current financial year and NHS employers will backdate the increase to April 2018.

A version of this article was first featured by Pulse's sister magazine Nursing in Practice

 

Readers' comments (4)

  • Be having to pay to come to work at this rate.

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  • Why don't RCN get the government to fund primary care the same rate as secondary care first? Then we talk about pay rise for those that work there - like the GP partners who's seen over 12% paycut over the last 10 years, nevermind inflationary part rise (which my nurses has been getting)

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  • UtterFool

    I think the government will screw partners financially until there aren’t any left. They’re basically getting work done for free, why would they stop? They’ll deal with the consequences later, for five quid saved today trumps a bill for £15 in 2 years on someone else’s watch. Nurses are a different animal, they’re salaried and employed and you can’t get them to work for free. Just like the all salaried GP service they keep pushing. Employing people on a salary has consequences, their rights are easier to identify, it’s less easy to pretend. Salaried folk won’t work for free , yes they are easier to control but they’re less flexible, less interested and ultimately less efficient (aka more expensive)..cause they don’t own the service and as a result they don’t really care.

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  • All salaried GP service would be great as long as we insist on:

    1) consultant level salary with defined clinic sizes
    2) SPA
    3) admin sessions
    4) clinical excellence awards

    A night on call would be 3 sessions obviously. And what happens when waits get too long??? Catch up clinics at enhanced rates.

    You can tell who had their newly qualified consultant friend visit last weekend....

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