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#GPnews: New drug 'could reduce symptoms of asthma'

16:15 Elsewhere this afternoon, Public Health England has said that measles are spreading at music festivals this summer and that a 'significant number' of cases can be linked to the events.

36 cases were reported in June and July this year and it is expected that more infected people are expected to be discovered as the outbreaks are investigated, the BBC reports

The health watchdog said that anyone planning to attend music festivals during the rest of the summer should ensure they are vaccinated against the disease. 

12:25 A new drug used to treat asthma could be a ‘game-changer for future treatment’ of the condition, according to a new study. 

The Huffington Post reports that the drug, called Fevipiprant, could potentially be able to 'reduce the symptoms of asthma in patients' 

The research – carried out by the University of Leicester – found that the drug decreased the symptoms of asthma, improve lung function, reduce inflammation and repair the lining of airways. 

Professor Christopher Brightling, clinical professor in respiratory medicine at the University of Leicester, said: 'We already know that using treatments to target eosinophilic airway inflammation can substantially reduce asthma attacks.

'This new treatment, Fevipiprant, could likewise help to stop preventable asthma attacks, reduce hospital admissions and improve day-to-day symptoms- making it a ‘game changer’ for future treatment.'

12:00 Breaking news at the start of the afternoon, as NHS St Helens CCG has put a block on all non-urgent referrals over the winter.

Read it in full here.

9:50 People under-report how mush they are eating, which is harming efforts tocurb the obesity epidemic, new research suggests.

The Behavioural Insights Team has found that scientific and economic data suggest people eat 3,000 calories, compared to the 2,000 cited in official surveys, and concludes that this explains why obesity levels are rising despite decades of surveys saying people are eating less.

The BBC reports that government statisticians say the way calorie data is collated will change.

Got a story? Let us know by tweeting the hashtag #GPnews or emailing newsdesk@pulsetoday.co.uk

Readers' comments (2)

  • Patient telling porkies no never!

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  • So people eat more than they say they eat; the only surprise here is that anyone could believe that self-reported surveys produce reliable data.

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