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Pulse hits the headlines again, GPs at the bottom of the NHS food chain and how brain surgery left a girl with the giggles

Our round up of health news headlines on Friday 5 August.

Our round up of health news headlines on Friday 5 August.

Pulse gets the honour of a page lead in the Daily Mail today, following our story of the GMC's pledge to look again at the guidance on GPs praying with their patients.

All babies should be routinely screened at birth for life-threatening heart defects, according to the Daily Mail's report from an editorial published in The Lancet.

Lots of reports about research in mice that could mean infertile men may be able to grow their own artificial sperm, including this one in the Independent.

A plucky seven-year old has been left giggling constantly surgeons operated to remove her brain tumour. Little Enna Stephens is in a permanent fit of giggles due to a neurological disorder caused by nerve damage, but which her parents say help them see the brighter side of her illness.

ENT surgeons have attacked the growing culture of labelling certain operations as low clinical priority procedures, and warned the current trend – which has seen tonsillectomies fall out of favour in the NHS – ‘could have dire consequences for patients' BBC health online warns.

The Telegraph says clinical negligence claims against the NHS have increased by a third in the last year, with more then £100 million paid to victims of medical blunders.

The Guardian reports that Labour is scoffing at health secretary Andrew Lansley's claim that the new Government has streamlined the NHS and stripped away tiers of bureaucracy, by publishing a colourful diagram of the new NHS – with no less than eleven levels of management, of which poor old GPs are right at the bottom.

And finally, stop tossing and turning all night, you fretful thing you. The Daily Telegraph says that rather than all the nonsense about milky drinks and counting sheep, listening to background noise – such as the TV or a fan – is the key to cutting the 37 minutes it takes on average for people to fall asleep. Night!

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