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Super sex disease, social climbing and lay off the salt

A roundup of the health news headlines on Tuesday 12 July.

It's with great difficulty that I've let slip a glaring opportunity to start the digest with a pun and tell you to take this news with a pinch of salt. But the Daily Mail says adding salt to your food is addictive – ‘in the same way as cigarettes and hard drugs' – in case you don't know what addictive means.

Social climbing is good for your health, also according to the Mail. Climbing to a higher tier of society than your parents existed in lowers your risk of high blood pressure by 42%, we're told.

A 22-stone man is challenging the decision of his primary care trust – NHS North Staffordshire – to refuse to fund his weight-loss surgery, the Independent says.

Ten minutes of digging in the garden or mowing the lawn counts towards recommended levels of exercise handed down from new ministerial edicts, The Times says, while the Daily Telegraph says we should all take up ‘vigorous games' like basketball or volleyball to keep fit.

And finally from the Mail, a warning of an UNSTOPPABLE SEX DISEASE. Yes, I'm sure their headline writers were hoping that would grab your attention, too. Gonorrhoea is back, folks, and this time – it's super.

But then somewhat undermining the scary headline, it then goes on to say: ‘Although only one case has been confirmed.' And in an unusual move, The Independent carries more salacious details of the superbug ‘outbreak' – from a prostitute in Japan.

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