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Tall people beware, premature menopause warning and 'Aquaholics' among us

Our round-up of the health headlines on Thursday 21 July.

An arrest has been made in connection with an investigation at Stepping Hill hospital, where 60 detectives are investigating the suspected murder of three patients through the deliberate introduction of insulin to saline solution.

The Independent, as do many other newspapers, pad out their report with interesting facts from Rebecca Leighton's Facebook profile such as she (sic) ‘loves the wkend'.

Tall people beware is the gist of the Daily Telegraph's story this morning, as they report  ‘tall people at greater cancer risk'. According to research, led by Dr Jane Green, the likelihood of developing cancer rises 16% with every 4 inches in height for women, with a similar pattern found in men.

Dr Green said: ‘One possible reason is fairly obvious - tall people have more cells so there is a greater chance that one of them could mutate. But being tall is also related to hormonal growth factors which leads to a higher turnover of cells and this is an interesting possibility.'

The Daily Mail harp on today about one of their favourite topics - career women foolishly delaying the joys of motherhood. It reports that women aren't fertile for as long as they like to think, so have babies NOW!

Their story today ‘Research reveals their fertile years could be shorter than feared – as these women discovered...' Tells the tales of three young women who went through the menopause early. Their cautionary tale is backed up by 'research' suggesting their could be a link between premature menopause and PFCs — chemicals found in non-stick pans and food packaging and also stress and poor diet.

‘Aquaholic' is the term coined to describe those who drink so much water that they are putting their health at risk.

The fad is even celebrity endorsed by Nigella Lawson, who has admitted in the past to drinking three litres of water before bed. The Sun tells the story of Chloe and Anna who respectively drink 6 and 9 litres a day. Anna says: ‘I'll drink whatever water is available but given a choice I'll always opt for sparkling mineral water, a taste I developed in my childhood.'

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