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Teenagers to access morning after pills from GPs and campaign to stop 21st century generation from buying cigarettes

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines on Wednesday 26 March.

Teenagers should be allowed access to the morning after pill from GPs surgeries, nurses and pharmacies in advance of sexual intercourse, the Guardian reports. The papers describes guidance by NICE to help cut teenage pregnancy rates.

The recommendations are highlighted in a NICE report. Professor Mike Kelly, director of NICE’s centre for public health, said: ‘Evidence clearly shows that the availability of contraception reduces the rate of unwanted pregnancies. Local planners and providers of services must make sure that what they offer is right for their area.’

The Telegraph describes a campaign by doctors to ban anyone born this century from buying cigarettes.

This ‘progressive prohibition’ will gradually eradicate the ‘devastating health effects’ of smoking, said one of the doctors, Tim Crocker-Buqué, a specialist registrar in public health medicine.

‘This is a highly addictive product that kills 50% of the users and it is so patently over the balance of harm that we must now work to prevent the next generation from falling into the nicotine trap,’ he told the Telegraph.

Readers' comments (1)

  • Why do we pay Professor Mike Kelly, director of NICE’s centre for public health, to state the obvious, and I quote ‘Evidence clearly shows that the availability of contraception reduces the rate of unwanted pregnancies. Local planners and providers of services must make sure that what they offer is right for their area.’
    How long did it take Prof Kelly to work out that availability of contraception is likely to reduce pregnancy rates, and stating that planners and providers of services should offer what is right for their area, is simply saying that they should be doing the job they get paid to do.
    Unbelievable!

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