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What do the Conservatives, sushi rolls and the Beatles have in common?

Our roundup of news headlines on Thursday 8 April.

By Lilian Anekwe

Our roundup of news headlines on Thursday 8 April.

They are all in stories in today's round-up, duh.

Far and away the most explosive story today is The Guardian's splash, for which I will doff my hat to Patrick Wintour.

Sir Peter Gershon, one of the Conservatives' experts who has advised them on how to make £12bn of efficiency savings in the NHS and across the public sector, is also chair of General Healthcare Group – the largest private sector health provider in the UK. I don't even need to jazz that up – make of it what you will.

As well as elegant investigative stories the Guardian is not averse to a good old-fashioned ‘random food type will cure you of an obscure disease' health story.

The seaweed used to wrap sushi rolls contains ‘friendly' bacteria that live in the human gut and help digest the sushi. If only the bacteria also help to digest all the sake you've knocked back with it and stave off a hangover, that would have been story of the day.

The Health Select Committee have called for immediate changes to how foreign doctors are regulated to avoid another out-of-hours disaster, The Independent says.

Poor sleep could be turning the nation's children to drink and drugs, the Daily Mail says. And if drunk and high kids are stressing you out, try transcendental meditation - which came to fame when it was adopted by the Beatles - which experts say can lower blood pressure.

And staying with spiritual, or specifically 'near death experience phenomena', the Daily Telegraph says scientists believe they have worked out what causes people to have near death experiences.

Is it religious belief? Not especially. The impending finality of death and brutal confirmation of man's mortality? No. A chemical reaction caused by high levels of common, garden-variety carbon dioxide in the blood? Why, yes. So does that mean that technically, if I hold my breath long enough, my life will flash before me? I'm off to try - I've got one or two things I want to fix....

Spotted a story we've missed? Let us know and we'll update the digest throughout the day...

Daily Digest

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