Cookie policy notice

By continuing to use this site you agree to our cookies policy below:
Since 26 May 2011, the law now states that cookies on websites can ony be used with your specific consent. Cookies allow us to ensure that you enjoy the best browsing experience.

This site is intended for health professionals only

At the heart of general practice since 1960

Are you burnt out? Take the test

Click here to take our burnout survey that has already been completed by 1,800 GPs.

The survey is based on the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory, and has been adapted for GPs. It has already been taken by 1,800 GPs and here are the results of that survey.

The inventory measures three key areas that signal a high risk of burning out – emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and a low level of personal accomplishment. If you have scores indicating burnout in all three areas then you are at high risk of burnout. Click here for resources that can help.

 

 

Readers' comments (3)

  • I am worried that i am expected to square a circle- I am expected to reduce referrals in face of increasing demands from patients- aging population with relatives wanting to keep them alive at any cost-and tighter controls in form of CQC etc.
    I am trying my best but not very optimistic about my success.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • I would say the excessive demands by QOF and some unreasonable repetitiveness eg chasing diabetic patients up every year to collect 300 urine samples for albumen is excessive, and changes with over emphasis on chronic diseases management when demand for emergency/urgent care is very high. CCG pressures on reducing GP emergency and elective referrals and A&E attendances, and pressures on restricting prescribing and switching medications, on patients with complex psycho-social-medical problems with their demands and expectations that have to be addressed within 10-15 mins consultations is extremely difficult to achieve. Overall all these factors are causing increased levels of stress and can lead to burnout to GPs. On top of this trying to achieve the 50 hours credits for annual appraisals for revalidation leaves very little time for family time, and especially when there are poorly ageing family members to attend to, creates even greater strain. GP's are human and they like everybody else need some time for rest, and attending to their homes and families.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • All I can say is thanks to a recent cancer diagnosis I can step off this hamster wheel which general practice has become.
    I am more relieved by that than worried about the cancer. How awful is that!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say