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'Why GP?' campaign takes off

A campaign highlighting why GPs love their jobs has taken off in recent days, using the moniker ‘Why GP?’.

The Because Project - started by Yorkshire-based GP and trainer Dr Dom Patterson - aims to encourage GPs to share the ‘wonder and privilege’ of being a GP.

Dr Patterson told Pulse he has launched the campaign because he noticed that ‘while well meaning and well produced’, the RCGP’s high-profile recruitment video launched earlier this year ‘just didn’t connect at all with the the younger students, F2s and trainees I spoke to’.

In response, scores of GPs have been sharing their reasons for being a GP on Twitter using the #whyGP hashtag and on the Why GP? website.

Dr Patterson works for Health Education England as a regional deputy director for postgraduate GP education and is an RCGP Council member, although he says the project is ‘a personal one and nothing to do with any of these roles’.

He told Pulse: ‘It is clear to me that in spite of all the current difficulties, the vast majority of GPs still love their jobs. This project simply tries to get people to stop and reflect on what it is about their job that means, in spite of everything else, they still love it.’

The Government has promised it will recruit an extra 5,000 GPs by 2020 but, despite pledges, last week Pulse reported that up to half of training places remain unfilled in some parts of England this year.

 

Readers' comments (25)

  • Righto: COI here - I know Dom as we tained together - but also declaration here too that Ive certainly earned my badge as one of those agitating for better GP terms and conditions (Founder and Co-Chiar of GP survival). Dom is a good guy - fact - and I agree with him - even amongst all the crap we put up with, tehre is still days - in fact EVERY day - where I can make a difference positively to someone's health, and that is an honour. I think we can say being a GP is a good thing and a great job in the right environemnet - but being a GP in the current NHS with its conditions and red tape is awful. The two arent impossble to co-exist.

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  • We are threatened economically both in our pay and with our inability to meet expectations. We are threatened by multiplying froms of jeapardy. We are threatened by the popular media and lastly and most importantly we are threatened by a political party that wants to destroy the NHS and creates a kafkaesque climate where nothing can be believed. This is the world outside the consulting room and I'm afraid suggesting that we can co-exist with it to young doctors when the majority of existing GPs find it hard does them a disservice.

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  • ..because i'm a sad pathetic git

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  • Reasons to be a GP.

    You enjoy the public making up numbers about wages paid and hours worked.
    You enjoy reading forums in the guardian and daily mail about how crap you are, stupid, lazy, greedy...
    You enjoy being referred to the GMC (25%)(especially if you are male and not white).
    You enjoy working from the moment you wake until sleep for an ungrateful public.
    You enjoy not seeing your children 4 days per week.
    You enjoy seeing people you graduated with, who stupidly decided on hospital medicine, give you a look of pity when they find out you became a GP.
    You enjoy the prospect of your speciality collapsing with nobody doing anything about it.
    You enjoy regretting your career choice from the moment you wake until you go to sleep.
    You enjoy daydreaming about emigrating.

    If this describes you (you young bright dynamic thing) come and join us.

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  • campaigning about why you may think a GP job in this country is the best is probably not going to make much difference but respect to you for trying.

    why not use your status in HEE and RCGP to actually lobby the government for decent conditions?

    Banging your drum isn't going to be the same as pied pipers flute. I think most f2's (who are likely to be have some of Britain's most intelligent produce) are going to be able to distinguish a good job from a bad one.

    sorry

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  • You do not need to sell it if it were that attractive. Be a banker...be a solicitor - no campaigns there!!

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  • If we need a campaign, why don't the neurosurgeons need one?
    If you answer that question then you will realise "whydon'ttouchwithabargepollGP".

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  • NHS employed GPs are no more than slaves to the system,accept whatever Employment Law infringements,docily they exert ,prescribe suphonyureas under duress despite their documented severe hypos ,without ability to prescribe Glucose testing strips

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  • You enjoy workload going up year on year and pay falling. Pensions, MPIG, seniority chopped. Imposed Contracts, ignoring Peverley and Mounce and all the angst and anxiety.

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  • Yes, I really enjoyed being thrown out of my partnership on a whim, after 6 years of slogging away at the job, CCG work (because no one else would), desperately trying to get a local GP company going to try to protect us (fail), often running practice with no other partner (mat leave), and then, when I burn out, instead of "how can we help you - you've been working too hard to try to help solve problems in the area", I get, "you're not committed if you want a sabbatical. It never happened in my day. We can't have someone like you as a partner. Push off now while you're off sick. We don't want you back as a partner, but you can work for us as a salaried Dr if you want."
    Go stuff yourselves. It all stinks. I'll get a new career and you can recruit a really rubbish clinician in my place.

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